Brazil

From Metapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
541px-Brazil (orthographic projection).svg.png

Brazil is a country in South America.

Brazil and race

Brazil has had large importation of Black slaves. A lack of White women contributed to extensive race mixing with Amerindians and Blacks. The slave trade was prohibited in 1850 and slavery was abolished in 1888. Brazil encouraged immigration of large numbers of Europeans in order to make Brazil more White. There was little assimilation/integration between the different immigrant groups and other groups. After 1930, various forced measures attempted to change this, including the implementation of ethnic immigration quotas, which caused further large-scale immigration of Whites to cease. More recently, affirmative action, anti-White education in schools, and other similar measures have been implemented, contributing to White flight from Brazil.[1][2]

The South is My Country movement is one example of support for the independence of Brazil's southern, wealthier, and more White states. This can be seen as attempted White flight.[3]

There is widespread racial segregation regarding neighborhoods. This also applies to persons having similar incomes and also between Blacks and Mulattoes.[4]

A 2015 articles stated that "For many Americans, Brazil means Rio de Janeiro, Carnival, pretty women, and a mixed-race land of no racial tension. This makes Brazil a potential model for the United States: Immigration from the Third World will enrich us and miscegenation will make us one. In fact, Brazil is a nation of low average intelligence, very high crime rates, an aversion to work, and widespread corruption."[1]

See also

External links

Encyclopedias

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Race in Brazil, Part I https://www.amren.com/features/2015/11/race-in-brazil-part-i/
  2. Race in Brazil, Part II https://www.amren.com/features/2015/11/race-in-brazil-part-ii/
  3. Brazil Runs into the Reality of Race https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2015/05/brazil_runs_into_the_reality_of_race.html
  4. Richard Lynn. The Global Bell Curve. 2008. Washington Summit Publishers.