Germany Must Perish!

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Map showing Kaufman's proposed dismemberment of Germany (and Austria).

Germany must Perish! is a 1941 book written by Theodore Newman Kaufman, a Jewish American businessman and writer.

The book called for the sterilization of the German people and the distribution of the German lands to other countries.

Politically correct views

The politically correct view, as stated in, for example, Wikipedia, is to depict Kaufman as an eccentric without any influence in the United States, but extensively used in German propaganda. Furthermore, Kaufman in 1939 had proposed sterilizing Americans if they would again participate in a war and in 1942 proposed democratic re-education of Germans rather than sterilization.

Revisionist views

The pamphlet had brisk sales for a time in 1941, and was reviewed by no less than the New York Times, the Washington Post, Time magazine and the Philadelphia Record. This brought it to the attention of Josef Goebbels, who then distributed a million copies of the screed with German commentary to the military as an inducement to resist surrender.[1]

This and release of some of the information regarding the Morgenthau Plan for a punitive occupation of Germany are thought by many to have, when combined with the demand for unconditional surrender, to have extended the war at a cost of millions of lives.[1]

When Stalin complained to Churchill that knowledge of the Morgenthau Plan was making the Germans fight harder, Churchill made subsequent remarks which might indicate that the extension was not all that unwelcome to him, as he deemed it important "to kill as many as possible in the field."[1]

When Robert H. Jackson was preparing to assume his responsibilities as the chief prosecutor at the Nuremberg trials he met with Judge Samuel Rosenman to examine papers related to an earlier plan made at Yalta to send several million Germans to Russia as slave laborers. When Jackson said that he did not believe that Roosevelt had agreed to anything like this, "Rosenman explained that F.D.R. had 'thought the Germans deserved to be so punished,' as the judge noted in his diary, 'and emotionally was very bitter [and] had even seriously discussed sterilisation and more or less in fun had devised a machine to perform the operation on a mass production basis.'"[1]

See also

External links

References

Part of this article consists of modified text from Wikipedia, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.