Genocide

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Many consider the Allied bombing of Germany during World War II a genocide; the picture shows Dresden in 1945.

The term genocide derives from the Greek genos (race) and the Latin -cide (killing).

Definition

The term was coined by the Jewish lawyer Raphael Lemkin in 1944. Between 1945 to 1946, Lemkin was an advisor to the American Zionist and Chief United States Prosecutor at the Nuremberg trials Robert H. Jackson. The term genocide appeared in the indictment of the National Socialist leaders, although they were formally charged with claimed crimes such as the vague "crimes against humanity" and "crimes against peace". See also Nuremberg trials: Non-trial of the Allies for atrocities and starting wars.

The etymology of genocide indicates that the term refers specifically to the killing of a race/ethnicity. However, the "Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide" (1948) instead describes it as "intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group". Thus, despite including some non-racial groups, the convention carefully does not include mass killings of groups perceived as political enemies, thereby excluding many mass killings under Communist regimes, such as of the kulaks, despite the Communists stating the aim "to exterminate the kulaks as a class". The convention also describes as genocide some non-killings, such as forcibly preventing a group from having children or transferring the children away from the group. Genocide according to the convention also includes causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of a group without killing them.

Another term is democide, which refers to mass killings of civilians from all causes by a government and excludes the non-killings described in the convention.

Genocides and other forms of mass killings have existed throughout human history, including many after WWII. However, today it is overwhelmingly the argued genocide during The Holocaust that is mentioned and described in the mass media. See also the article on Holocaust uniqueness.

See the "External links" for lists and descriptions of various genocides and mass killings, many likely being completely unknown to general public.

Regarding the "White genocide conspiracy theory", see the article on this topic.

History

The next claims were in ancient times where after a long siege, invaders would murder everyone in the city. There's many accounts of this such as the city of Troy, Cathage, and accounts of The Mongol Empire. In The Bible, the jews specifically would mass murder people for not worshipping Yahweh and would wipe out entire populaces, though this may be questioned since it could be more religious-based. There have been cases of disease unintentionally killing large populations such as in Europe's Black Death and later in the Americas, however the disease was unintentional and there never was a systematic usage of it for genocide since disease cannot be controlled, despite hoax claims.

So then, the earliest confirmed case of genocide was in Haiti in 1804, where the negroes murdered all of the white people in the island. They then gradually murdered the mulattoes too. The first confirmed genocide was blacks genociding white people. You'll notice this fact is supressed in schools and universities.

The next case was The Irish Holocaust (aka. Potato Famine). Many people wonder why didn't the Irish grow other crops or go fishing for food? This was because they were made to farm on the land by the British who had their country taken over financially a few decades earlier by the jewish Rothschild crime family in 1815 following the Battle of Waterloo.[1]

The next case came about in The Soviet Empire. Like the previous one, this was also masterminded by jews. The Red Holocaust killed about 100 million people and is the largest genocide in mankind's history. Since then, smaller genocides have occured such as in Zimbabwe and South Africa.

Quotes

  • And the one idea is, how we are going to exterminate white people because that, in my estimation, is the only conclusion I have come to. We have to exterminate white people off the face of the planet, to solve this problem. [...] [We need to] get very serious and not be diverted from coming up with a solution to the problem and the problem on the planet is white people.Kamau Kambon in 2005

See also

Sometimes described as genocide

Further reading

External links

Genocides and mass killings

History of the concept

References