Nation und Europa

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Nation und Europa formerly Nation Europa is a monthly magazine, published in Germany, that was originally established in support of Pan-European nationalism. It was founded in 1951 and is based in Coburg.

Development

Founded by former SS-Sturmbannführer Arthur Ehrhardt and Herbert Boehme, it took its title from a phrase sometimes used by Sir Oswald Mosley to describe his Europe a Nation vision. Adopting a Europe-wide vision, writers such as Gaston-Armand Amaudruz and Maurice Bardèche were closely associated with the publication. Initially its largest single shareholder was Swedish pro-National Socialist and former Olympic athlete Carl-Ehrenfried Carlberg.[1] It was edited by Ehrhardt in association with a board of five made up of Per Engdahl, Hans Oehler, Paul van Tienen, Erik Laerum and Erich Kern.[2]

In later years the publication would become more closely associated with Deutsche Liga für Volk und Heimat. The publication has been accused of giving space to National Socialists and has been investigated by the German government to this end. It has also been associated with Holocaust skepticism and praised Mahmoud Ahmadinejad when he announced a conference on the topic. The magazine was renamed Nation und Europa in February 1990. Since 2000 Nation und Europa has merged with Lesen und Schenken. They now publish a new journal of current affairs called Zuerst.

A selection of NE authors

External links

References

  1. Philip Rees, Biographical Dictionary of the Extreme Right Since 1890, p. 54
  2. G. Macklin, Very Deeply Dyed in Black, London, 2007, p. 180
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Philip Rees, Biographical Dictionary of the Extreme Right Since 1890, 1990
  4. Karl Dietrich Bracher, The German Dictatorship, Penguin, 1970, p. 585
  5. Graham Macklin, Very Deeply Dyed in Black, New York: IB Tauris, 2007, p. 102
  6. Macklin, Very Deeply Dyed in Black, p. 114
  7. Cas Mudde, The Ideology of the Extreme Right, Manchester University Press, 2000, p. 35
  8. Macklin, Very Deeply Dyed in Black, p. 85
  9. Stephen Dorril, Blackshirt: Sir Oswald Mosley & British Fascism, 2007, p. 591
  10. Macklin, Very Deeply Dyed in Black, p. 111
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