Britons Publishing Society

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Britons Publishing Society
BPS
Existence 1919—1970
Type publishing society
Purpose Anti-Semitism
British nationalism
Christian nationalism
Anti-Communism
Location United Kingdom
Leader Henry Hamilton Beamish
John Henry Clarke

The Britons Publishing Society, formerly known as the Judaic Publishing Company and the Britons Publishing Company, was originally founded in 1919 by the organization The Britons, “to protect the birthright of Britons and eradicate the Alien influences from our politics and industries.”[1] They were instrumental in keeping The Protocols of the Elders of Zion in print and published eighty-five editions.

History

The Britons political group

The organisation began as a political group named The Britons also known as the Briton Society and The Britons Patriotic Society as a British nationalist society founded by Henry Hamilton Beamish and thirteen others on July 18, 1919.[2] It was particularly noted for its opposition to Jewish supremacism and international Bolshevism. Membership was initially restricted to persons who could prove two generations of native British ancestry. In December 1920, The Britons decided to expand their eligibility requirements by admitting ‘pure nationals of other branches of the Aryan family’ as associate members.[3]

Their ideology on racial fitness and the Jewish question was consistent with the NSDAP in Germany although later there were disagreements over the Nationalist Socialist reorganization of the state and the promotion of pagan traditions in a Christian nation.[4] The society favored complete segregation of the British people from the Jews with their eventual deportation to Palestine. They hoped the Zionist Homeland would become the ‘Ghetto of the World.’[5]

Most of the early members, including Beamish had become critical of Jewish influence following the Second Boer War, which they argued had been waged to put Jewish randlords in control of the gold and diamond mines there. A. H. Lane, James Dell, Prebendary Gough, G. P. Mudge and John Henry Clarke were prominent members. Admiral Domvile, Lord Sydenham and Joseph Bannister were supporters of The Britons.[6]

Publishing group

The society became largely inactive by 1925 but continued as a publishing group.[7] Beamish founded the Judaic Publishing Company, as a publishing company which produced material critical of Jewish supremacism. Beamish had taken over the earlier publication of The Jewish Peril from Eyre & Spottiswoode, and published it under the imprint of The Britons. In August 1922 the company was renamed under the banner of the Britons Publishing Company. In 1932, it became Britons Publishing Society and in its history printed eighty-five editions of the Protocols and similar materials until the 1970s.[8]

Published books

Pamphlets

  • The Jewish Bolshevism (1922) preface by Alfred Rosenberg[9]
  • White Labour versus Red: with a Synopsis of the Protocols (1922) by John Henry Clarke, 11 pages
  • Jews in Russia (1921)
  • The Bolshevists of Ancient History (1924) by Apionus (pseud. for Harold Sherwood Spencer)
  • Halt, Gentile! and Salute the Jew (1935)
  • A Plot for the World's Conquest (1936)
  • Who Wants War? Part II (1936), 8 pages
  • The Future Domination (1938), 9 pages
  • On Race, Heredity and Civilization: Human Progress and The Race Problem, (1963) by Wesley Critz George

References

  1. Very Deeply Dyed in Black, By Graham Macklin, p. 30
  2. British Fascism: Essays on the Radical Right in inter-war Britain, by Kenneth Lunn and Richard C. Thurlow, page 42
  3. British Fascism: Essays on the Radical Right in inter-war Britain, by Kenneth Lunn and Richard C. Thurlow, page 43
  4. British Fascism: Essays on the Radical Right in inter-war Britain, by Kenneth Lunn and Richard C. Thurlow, page 53
  5. Bolsheviks and British Jews, By Sharman Kadish, page 41
  6. Roots of Hate: Anti-Semitism in Europe before the Holocaust, by William Brustein, p. 310
  7. British Fascism: Essays on the Radical Right in inter-war Britain, by Kenneth Lunn and Richard C. Thurlow, page 46
  8. Fascism in Britain: A History, 1918-1945, by Richard Thurlow, page 44
  9. Bolsheviks and British Jews, By Sharman Kadish, page 42

See also

External links