Lois de Lafayette Washburn

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Lois de Lafayette Washburn (April 5, 1893 - August 1976)[1] of Chicago and Tacoma, Washington was defendant in the Great Sedition Trial of 1944. She was one of the leaders of the National Liberty Party and was a founder of the National Gentile League.[2] and in October 1937 National Secretary of the American Gentile Protective Association.

In 1936 and 1937 she worked with George W. Christians in forming the Crusaders for Economic Liberty organization in Chicago.[3]

By 1942 she moved to the Seattle, Washington area and helped Frank W. Clark run the National Liberty Party.[4]

In 1944 she worked with North Carolina’s Senator Robert Reynolds as his secretary when he formed the American Nationalist Party.[5]

She was employed as a stenographer and taught night classes in Washington DC to support herself during the sedition trial. In 1937 she authored a book on shorthand dictation, Syllabic writing: the syllables, setments and phrases of the entire English language[6]

At the time of the trial she was a widow age 50.[7]

She claimed to be a descendent of Marquis de Lafayette, a French general who fought in the American Revolution.[8]

Pamphlets

  • Yankee Freeman
  • Yankee Minute Man

Notes

  1. Social Security Death Master File
  2. The Berlin Observer (US military occupation paper), May 31, 1946
  3. Women of the Far Right: the Mothers' Movement and World War II, by Glen Jeansonne, page 154
  4. Women of the Far Right: the Mothers' Movement and World War II, by Glen Jeansonne, page 154
  5. Buncombe Bob, by Julian M. Pleasants, p. 175.
  6. Syllabic writing: the syllables, setments and phrases of the entire English language, by Lois de Lafayette Washburn
  7. Women of the Far Right: the Mothers' Movement and World War II, by Glen Jeansonne, page 154
  8. Women of the Far Right: the Mothers' Movement and World War II, by Glen Jeansonne, page 154
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