Saddam Hussein

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Saddam Hussein.

Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (April 28, 1937December 30, 2006), was a nationalist and socialist politician, President of Iraq from July 16, 1979, until April 9, 2003. Due to is political views and staunch anti-Zionism, he was an enemy of both Israel and U.S.A.. His government managed for the most part, to stop the various, rival sectarian groups within Iraq from being able to tear each other a part. He was hanged following the American led invasion of Iraq .

Contents

Biography

Saddam was born on April 28, 1937 into a poor family living in Tikrit [1]. The name Saddam, which means "he who faces the agressor", was given to him by his uncle[1]. His father had died shortly before he was born[1].

By the 1960s, Saddam had emerged as a Baath party leader [2]. A leading member of the revolutionary Baath party, which espoused secular pan-Arabism, economic modernization, and Arab socialism, Saddam played a key role in the 1968 coup that brought the Baath party to long-term power. This coup took place on July 17, 1968[3]. Ahmed Hassan al-Bakr became Iraq's new president and Saddam, at the age of 31, became the vice president [4].

As vice president under the ailing General Ahmed Hassan al-Bakr, Saddam tightly controlled conflict between the government and the armed forces — at a time when many other groups were considered capable of overthrowing the government — by creating repressive security forces. In the early 1970s, Saddam spearheaded Iraq's nationalization of the Iraq Petroleum Company, which had long held a monopoly on the country's oil. Through the 1970s, Saddam cemented his authority over the apparatuses of government as Iraq's economy grew at a rapid pace.

Saddam Hussein with gun.

CIA documents later would reveal that the United States helped Saddam launch chemical weapons attacks on Iran.[5]

As president, Saddam maintained power through the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988) and the first Persian Gulf War (1991). During these conflicts, Saddam repressed movements he deemed threatening to the stability of Iraq, particularly Shi'a and Kurdish movements seeking to overthrow the government or gain independence, respectively. While he remained popular among many Arabs everywhere for reasons such as his support for the Palestinians, neocon U.S. leaders continued to view Saddam with deep suspicion following the 1991 Persian Gulf War. Saddam was deposed by the U.S. and its allies during the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

Captured by U.S. forces on December 13, 2003, Saddam was brought to trial under the Iraqi puppet government set up by U.S.-led forces. On November 5, 2006, he was convicted of charges related to the executions of 148 Iraqi Shi'ites suspected of planning an assassination attempt against him, and was sentenced to death by hanging. Saddam was executed on December 30, 2006.

See also

Further reading

  • Nita Renfrew (1992) SADDAM HUSSEIN, Chelsea House Publishers, New York - Philadelphia, 128pp.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Nita Renfrew (1992) SADDAM HUSSEIN, Chelsea House Publishers, New York - Philadelphia, 128pp. page 23.
  2. Nita Renfrew (1992) SADDAM HUSSEIN, Chelsea House Publishers, New York - Philadelphia, 128pp. page 48.
  3. Nita Renfrew (1992) SADDAM HUSSEIN, Chelsea House Publishers, New York - Philadelphia, 128pp. page 50.
  4. Nita Renfrew (1992) SADDAM HUSSEIN, Chelsea House Publishers, New York - Philadelphia, 128pp. page 50-51.
  5. http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/08/25/secret_cia_files_prove_america_helped_saddam_as_he_gassed_iran

External links

Part of this article consists of modified text from Wikipedia, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.
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