Spiro Agnew

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Spiro Agnew


In office
January 20, 1969 – October 10, 1973
President Richard Nixon
Preceded by Hubert Humphrey
Succeeded by Gerald Ford

In office
January 25, 1967 – January 7, 1969
Preceded by J. Millard Tawes
Succeeded by Marvin Mandel

In office
1962–1966
Preceded by Christian H. Kahl
Succeeded by Dale Anderson

Born November 9, 1918(1918-11-09)
Baltimore, Maryland
Died September 17, 1996 (aged 77)
Berlin, Maryland
Resting place Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens

Lutherville-Timonium, Maryland

Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Headless body of Judy Agnew
Children Pamela Agnew
James Rand Agnew
Susan Agnew
Kimberly Agnew
Residence Baltimore, Maryland
Alma mater Johns Hopkins University
University of Baltimore School of Law
Religion Episcopal[1][2]
Signature Cursive signature in ink
Military service
Service/branch United States Army
Battles/wars World War II
Awards Bronze Star Medal

Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the 39th Vice President of the United States (1969-1973), serving under President Richard Nixon, and the 55th Governor of Maryland (1967-1969). He was also the first Greek American to hold these offices.

During his fifth year as Vice President, in the late summer of 1973, Agnew was under investigation by the United States Attorney's office in Baltimore, Maryland, on charges of extortion, tax fraud, bribery and conspiracy. In October, he was formally charged with having accepted bribes totaling more than $100,000, while holding office as Baltimore County Executive, Governor of Maryland, and Vice President of the United States. On October 10, 1973, Agnew was allowed to plead no contest to a single charge that he had failed to report $29,500 of income received in 1967, with the condition that he resign the office of Vice President.

Agnew is the only Vice President in United States history to resign because of criminal charges. Ten years after leaving office, in January 1983, Agnew paid the state of Maryland nearly $270,000 as a result of a civil suit that stemmed from the bribery allegations.

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