Shogun

From Metapedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Shogun (literally, "a commander of a force") is a military rank and historical title for (in most cases) hereditary military dictator of Japan.[1] The modern rank is equivalent to a Generalissimo. Although the original meaning of "shogun" is simply "a general", as a title, it is used as the short form of seii taishōgun, the governing individual at various times in the history of Japan, ending when Tokugawa Yoshinobu relinquished the office to the Meiji Emperor in 1867.[2]

A shogun's office or administration is known in English as a "shogunate". In Japanese it was known as bakufu which literally means "tent office", and originally meant "house of the general", and later also suggested a private government. Bakufu could also mean "tent government" and was the way the government was run under a shogun.[3] The tent symbolized the field commander but also denoted that such an office was meant to be temporary. The shogun's officials were as a collective the bakufu, and were those who carried out the actual duties of administration while the Imperial court retained only nominal authority.[4]

Part of this article consists of modified text from Wikipedia, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.

References

  1. Shogun from Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved on 2009-11-30.
  2. "Shogun". The World Book Encyclopedia. World Book. 1992. pp. 432–433. ISBN 0-7166-0092-7. 
  3. Totman, Conrad (1966). "Political Succession in The Tokugawa Bakufu: Abe Masahiro's Rise to Power, 1843-1845". Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 26: 102–124. doi:10.2307/2718461.
  4. Beasley, William G. (1955). Select Documents on Japanese Foreign Policy, 1853–1868, p. 321.