Lawrence Auster

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Lawrence Auster

Lawrence Auster (January 26, 1949 – March 29, 2013) was an American blogger and essayist. Auster was born Jewish but later converted to the Episcopal Church, and entered the Catholic Church shortly before his death. He attended Columbia University. He resided in Manhattan.

He authored The Path to National Suicide: An Essay on Immigration and Multiculturalism and Huddled Clichés: Exposing the fraudulent arguments that have opened America's borders to the world as well as articles for FrontPage Magazine, Mandate, NewsMax, the Council of Conservative Citizens' Citizens Informer, American Renaissance, The Social Contract Press, National Review, the Occidental Quarterly and WorldNetDaily. The Path to National Suicide is regarded, along with Peter Brimelow's, Alien Nation, as a foundational text in the modern immigration restriction movement. Auster hosted a daily blog, VFR (View from the Right), which included trenchant commentary on current events, politics, society and culture from a traditionalist U.S. conservative, anti-Islamic, anti-liberal and anti-immigration viewpoint. Many activists regard his blog as one of the most influential in creating the grass roots opposition which defeated the so-called McCain-Kennedy-Bush Immigration Bill in the Senate in June of 2007.

Auster had attacked both Neoconservatives and Paleoconservatives. His main target on the right were the neocons who he claimed are able to identify the problem of radical Islam but refuse to do anything substantial about it such as reducing or eliminating Islamic immigration. Instead (according to Auster), neoconservatives advocate nation building abroad, and fail to recognize Islam itself as the cause of Islamic radicalism. He also criticized paleoconservatives such as Patrick Buchanan for their criticism of Israel.

On Auster's site, well known paleoconservatives have submitted numerous comments. These include Joel T. LeFevre, editor of the Citizens Informer, Roy Beck, National Review columnist Andrew McCarthy, left wing Jewish Canadian journalist Ken Hechtman, American Renaissance member Eugene Valberg, and columnists for the online magazine VDARE such as Paul Gottfried, Marcus Epstein, Allan Wall, Robert Locke, Howard Sutherland and Eugene Girin.

The Southern Poverty Law Center has attacked Auster claiming he was a racist, because he spoke at an American Renaissance conference. He criticized Jared Taylor for his tolerating the former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke and Stormfront moderator Jamie Kelso who attended the conference. Auster, however, still supported Taylor's personal views as well as those of Samuel Francis, another frequent speaker at the conferences. Robert Locke, a New York City friend of Auster and fellow columnist at FrontPageMag defended Auster against the charges of the SPLC.

Auster was often cited by advocates of immigration restriction and cultural conservatism. Pat Buchanan has cited Auster's monograph, The Path to National Suicide, as one of the sources for his own book, State of Emergency: The Third World Invasion and Conquest of America.[1]

On May 4, 2007 Auster was expelled from FrontPage Magazine, because of the controversy over an article he wrote commenting on Afro-American rapists.

Lawrence Auster died on March 29, 2013, Good Friday, of pancreatic cancer. Long an Anglican who had grown disgusted with the direction of the Episcopal Church, he converted to Roman Catholicism on Palm Sunday, five days before his death.[2][3]

Works

Notes

  1. Patrick J. Buchanan. State of Emergency: The Third World Invasion and Conquest of America. New York: Thomas Dunne Books, 2006, pp. 140; 238-239; 284 n. 7; 293 n. 39; 294 n. 40, 44, 4.
  2. LAWRENCE AUSTER: JANUARY 26, 1949 - MARCH 29, 2013 View from the Right.
  3. Henry McCullough. In Memoriam: Lawrence Auster—A Great, Sometimes Irascible, Fighter For Tradition VDare. March 29, 2013. Accessed March 31, 2013.

External links

Part of this article consists of modified text from Wikipedia, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.