Bulgarians

From Metapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Българи
Bulgarians
Боян Расате.jpg Мико Вълчев.jpg Ilyo Voyvoda.jpg
Boyan Rassate Miko Valchev Ilyo Voyvoda
Dimitar Spisarevski.png Hristo Lukov.JPG Alexander Belev.jpg
Dimitar Spisarevski Hristo Lukov Alexander Belev
Mara Buneva.jpg Ivet Lalova.jpg Albena Denkova.jpg
Mara Buneva Ivet Lalova Albena Denkova
Total population
>9 million[1]
Regions with significant populations
 Bulgaria 5,664,624 (incomplete 2011 census data)
6,000,000 (2011 estimate)[2]
 Greece 300,000 [3]
 Ukraine 204,574 [4]
 Spain 150,878 [5][6]
 United States 95,568 – 300,000 [7]

[8][9]

 Germany 93,889 [10][11]
 Moldova (incl. Transnitria) 79,520[c]- 90,000 [12][13]
 Argentina 70,000 [14]
 Brazil 65,000 [15][16]
 Italy 51,134 [17][18]
 Canada 50,000 [19]
 United Kingdom 47,000 [20]
 Austria 35,000
 France 34,000[d] [21]
 Russia 31,965 [22]
 Serbia 18,543 [23]
 Cyprus 19,197 [24]
 South Africa 15,000 – 20,000 [25]
 Netherlands 10,000 – 15,000
 Poland 10,000 – 12,000 [26]
 Romania 8,092 [27]
 Czech Republic 7,387 [28]
 Portugal 7,202 – 12,000 [29]
 Kazakhstan 6,915 [30]
 United Arab Emirates 5,000 [31]
 Australia 4,898 – 20,000 [32]

 Sweden 4,000 [33]
 Hungary 3,556 [34]
 Ireland 4,000
 Belgium 3,500 – 4,500
 New Zealand 3,000 – 5,000
 Slovakia 1,842
Languages

Cyrylicka litera Б.PNG Bulgarian

Religion

Predominantly Orthodox Christianity
(Bulgarian Orthodox Church)
with Sunni Islam (Pomaks) Catholic and Protestant minorities

Related ethnic groups

South Slavic peoples, especially Macedonians

Footnotes
a[›] In Turkey 300,000 speak Bulgarian language as mother tongue,[35] while nowadays several million can claim ancestral descent as a result of Devsirme and other turkification and assimilation practices during Ottoman rule.

The Bulgarians are indo-european (aryan) people of the Iranian branch of indo-european peoples. Today the official statistics the number of bulgarians in the world is about 9 million, but unofficial, their numbers is many times greater. Bulgarians are mostly people of Bulgaria, constituting 83.9 percent of its population (2001).

History

Up to 7 century bulgarians are divided into 2 groups: balkan bulgarian thracian known in historical science as a thracian people moesians and scythian-sarmatian bulgarians who are known by the name "proto-bulgarians". After the Bulgarians defeated the Emperor Constantine in 680 years, conquered the lands that were part of the Eastern Roman Empire for centuries objectives, forcing the byzantines to recognize the Bulgarian Empire and its pay tribute to the byzantines bulgarians became "dirty and unclean people, they often called "scythians" and "moesians".

Process of assimilation

After World War II and another partition of the Bulgarian lands when Vardar Macedonia re-enter the composition of Yugoslavia, with the arrival of yugoslav communists came to power in 1944, bulgarians and create terrorize the macedonian nation. Today the newly formed state of Macedonia continues to lead the anti-bulgarian policy against self-determination as bulgarian[36].

Video

External links

Note

  1. UCLA - Bulgarian language.
  2. Bulgarian 2011 census (Bulgarian). nsi.bg. Retrieved on 2012-10-15.
  3. Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Bulgarian).[dead link]
  4. Ukrainian 2001 census. ukrcensus.gov.ua. Retrieved on 2008-04-28.
  5. National Institute of Statistics of Spain – 2011 Census (Spanish). ine.es. Retrieved on 2011-02-08.
  6. Bulgaria air. air.bg. Archived from the original on 2010-12-25.
  7. http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_10_1YR_B04003&prodType=table
  8. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria – Bulgarians in the US (Bulgarian). mfa.bg.
  9. Bulgarian Embassy in Washington – estimate for Bulgarians in the US (Bulgarian). 19min.bg.
  10. Federal Statistical Office of Germany – Foreigners in 2010 (German). www.destatis.de. Retrieved on 2011-02-08.
  11. Bulgarian students in Germany. www.dw.de.
  12. Moldovan 2004 census. statistica.md.
  13. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria – Bulgarians in Moldova (Bulgarian). mfa.bg. Retrieved on 2011-02-08.
  14. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria – Bulgarians in Argentina (Bulgarian). mfa.bg. Retrieved on 2008-04-29.
  15. IBGE 2006
  16. bTV – estimate for Bulgarians in Brazil (Bulgarian). btv.bg.
  17. Foreign population resident in Italy (Italian). istat.it. Retrieved on 2012-04-23.
  18. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria – Bulgarians in Italy (Bulgarian). mfa.bg. Retrieved on 2011-02-08.[dead link]
  19. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria – Bulgarians in Canada (Bulgarian). mfa.bg. Retrieved on 2011-02-08.
  20. UK Migration Statistics Quarterly Aug 2012 – Bulgarians in the UK (Bulgarian). mfa.bg. Retrieved on 2011-02-08.
  21. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria – Bulgarians in France (Bulgarian). mfa.bg. Retrieved on 2011-02-08.
  22. Russian 2002 census (Russian). perepis2002.ru. Retrieved on 2008-05-12.
  23. Serbian 2011 census. Statistical Office of the Republic of Serbia. Retrieved on 2012-12-25.
  24. Cypriot 2011 census. cystat.gov.cy.
  25. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria – Bulgarians in South Africa (Bulgarian). mfa.bg. Retrieved on 2011-02-08.
  26. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria – Bulgarians in Poland (Bulgarian). mfa.bg.
  27. Romanian 2002 census (Romanian). edrc.ro.
  28. Czech Statistical Office – Foreigners in 11.2011 (Czech). czso.cz.
  29. National Institute of Statistics of Portugal – Foreigners in 2009 (Portuguese). sefstat.sef.pt. Retrieved on 2011-04-16.
  30. You must specify title = and url = when using {{cite web}}..
  31. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria – Bulgarians in the UAE (Bulgarian). mfa.bg. Retrieved on 2008-04-30.
  32. Australian 2006 census. abs.gov.au. Archived from the original on 2008-12-09.
  33. Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria – Bulgarians in Sweden (Bulgarian). mfa.bg.
  34. Census of Hungary 2011.
  35. (2005) "Languages of Turkey (Europe)", in Gordon, Raymond G., Jr.: Ethnologue: Languages of the World, Fifteenth edition, Dallas, Texas: SIL International. ISBN 978-1-55671-159-6. 
  36. http://www.freemacedonia.net/statia.php?sn=267&t=2&