World Wide Web

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The World Wide Web, abbreviated as WWW and commonly known as The Web, is a system of interlinked hypertext documents contained on the Internet. With a web browser, one can view web pages that may contain text, images, videos, and other multimedia and navigate between them by using hyperlinks. Using concepts from earlier hypertext systems, English engineer and computer scientist Sir Tim Berners Lee, now the Director of the World Wide Web Consortium, wrote a proposal in March 1989 for what would eventually become the World Wide Web.[1] He was later joined by Belgian computer scientist Robert Cailliau while both were working at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. In 1990, they proposed using "HyperText [...] to link and access information of various kinds as a web of nodes in which the user can browse at will",[2] and released that web in December.[3]

"The World-Wide Web (W3) was developed to be a pool of human knowledge, which would allow collaborators in remote sites to share their ideas and all aspects of a common project." [4] If two projects are independently created, rather than have a central figure make the changes, the two bodies of information could form into one cohesive piece of work.

Part of this article consists of modified text from Wikipedia, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.

References

  1. Tim Berners Lee - Time 100 People of the Century. Time Magazine. “He wove the World Wide Web and created a mass medium for the 21st century. The World Wide Web is Berners-Lee's alone. He designed it. He loosed it on the world. And he more than anyone else has fought to keep it open, nonproprietary and free. .”
  2. "WorldWideWeb: Proposal for a hypertexts Project (November 12, 1990). Retrieved on July 27, 2009.
  3. Berners-Lee, Tim. Pre-W3C Web and Internet Background. World Wide Web Consortium. Retrieved on April 21, 2009.
  4. Wardrip-Fruin, Noah and Nick Montfort, ed (2003). The New Media Reader. Section 54. The MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-23227-8.
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