World Jewish Congress

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The World Jewish Congress, which operates in over 100 countries in 6 continents in order to advance Jewish interests worldwide, states that "a so-called Jewish global conspiracy" is a "big lie".

The World Jewish Congress (WJC) was founded in Geneva, Switzerland, in August 1936 as an international federation of Jewish communities and organizations. According to its mission statement, the World Jewish Congress' main purpose is to act as "the diplomatic arm of the Jewish people."

Membership in the WJC is open to all representative Jewish groups or communities, irrespective of the social, political or economic ideology of the community's host country. The World Jewish Congress headquarters are in New York City, US, and the organization maintains international offices in Brussels, Belgium; Jerusalem, Israel; Paris, France; Moscow, Russia; Buenos Aires, Argentina; and Geneva, Switzerland. Jewish umbrella organizations in 100 countries are directly affiliated to the World Jewish Congress.

The WJC also maintains a Research Institute based in Jerusalem, Israel. It is involved in research and analysis of a variety of issues of importance to contemporary Jewry, and its findings are published in the form of policy dispatches. Also operating under the auspices of the World Jewish Congress in Israel, the Israel Council on Foreign Relations has since its inception in 1989 hosted heads of state, prime ministers, foreign ministers and other distinguished visitors to Israel and has issued several publications on Israeli foreign policy and international affairs, including its tri-annual foreign policy journal, the Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs.

According to Wikipedia, the WJC's current policy priorities include combating anti-Semitism, especially the rise of "neo-Nazi" parties in Europe, providing political support for Israel, opposing the "Iranian threat", and dealing with the legacy of the Holocaust, notably with respect to property restitution, reparation and compensation for "Holocaust survivors", as well as with Holocaust remembrance. One of the WJC's major programs is concerned with the Jewish exodus from Arab and Muslim countries. The WJC is also involved in inter-faith dialogue with Christian and Muslim groups.

One criticism is that WJC affiliates have been involved in restricting speech in counties such as Canada and the United Kingdom.[1][2][3]

In 2013 the World Jewish Congress passed a resolution demanding that all the countries of the world must prohibit public "Holocaust denial".[4]

The book Lectures on the Holocaust states that an established Jewish author who visited a Holocaust revisionist conference wrote regarding hate that "I would see none of it, certainly less than I would see when Jews were speaking of Germans. No one had ever said anything remotely like Elie Wiesel, ‘Every Jew, somewhere in his being, should set aside a zone of hate–healthy, virile hate – for what persists in the Germans,’ and no one had said anything like Edgar Bronfman, the president of the World Jewish Congress. A shocked professor told Bronfman once, ‘You are teaching a whole generation to hate thousands of Germans,’ and Bronfman replied, ‘No, I am teaching a whole generation to hate millions of Germans.’"[5]

External links

References

  1. Jewish Involvement in Immigration and Anti Free Speech Legislation - Canada. Balder. Retrieved on 6 June 2010.
  2. What a strange place Canada is. Globe and Mail. Retrieved on 6 June 2010.
  3. Jewish Involvement in Immigration and Anti Free Speech Legislation - British. Balder. Retrieved on 6 June 2010.
  4. WJC Approves Resolution Calling for Ban of Public Holocaust Denial http://www.haaretz.com/jewish/news/wjc-approves-resolution-calling-for-ban-of-public-holocaust-denial.premium-1.519763
  5. Holocaust Handbooks, Volume 15: Germar Rudolf: Lectures on the Holocaust—Controversial Issues Cross Examined 2nd, revised and corrected edition. http://holocausthandbooks.com/index.php?page_id=15
Part of this article consists of modified text from Wikipedia, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.
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