Scribner's Commentator

From Metapedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Scribner's Commentator self-described as The National Magazine for an Independent American Destiny was a leading isolationist publication and the unofficial voice of the America First Committee. It appeared from November 1939 to January 1942. The journal was the result of the 1939 merger of Scribner's owned by the publisher Charles Scribner’s Sons and Commentator owned by Charles S. Payson, president of Payson Publishing Company.[1] The primary mission of Scribner's Commentator was to counter the liberal Jewish-dominated interventionist media.[2] Although the publication was seen as primarily political about half of the articles were devoted to nature stories and human interest features.[3]

Douglas M. Stewart was the day-to-day publisher although his cousin banker Jeremiah Milbank who helped to finance the operation was considered the co-publisher. Francis Rufus Bellamy was the first editor with Lowell Thomas as assistant editor. By the middle of 1940 both Bellamy and Thomas were replaced by George Eggleston.

Contents

Move to Lake Geneva

In July 1941 the offices and staff of ten moved the publication from New York to Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, a popular retreat for wealthy Gentiles. The building that held the new offices was a remolded blacksmith’s shop. The move was necessary since while in New York, the publication had received considerable harassment from the communist-leaning paper PM in addition to stolen correspondence from the US mail.[4]

After the attack on Pearl Harbor Scribner's Commentator cease publication. There is speculation the issue prepared before December 7 was never mailed and a final "Win the War" January 1942 issue was quickly put together and sent to subscribers.[5] Subscribers were offered a refund on their remaining subscription or the option of receiving DeWitt Wallace’s Reader's Digest.[6] In the past Reader's Digest reprinted several articles from Scribner's Commentator.

Scribner's Commentator had a circulation of 30,000.[7] Its sister publication was the weekly newspaper, The Herald.

Contributors

A

B

C

D

E

F

  • John T. Flynn, "Radio--Interventionism’s Trump" (April 1941) "Nazi Economy--A Threat?" (August 1941)
  • Henry Ford, "An American Foreign Policy" (December 1940)
  • Rev. Harry Emerson Fosdick, "Are We Fit for Democracy?" (January 1941)

G

H

J

K

L

M

N

  • Albert Jay Nock, "Out Of The Night--A Review" (June 1941); "Review of Jawaharlal Nehru Toward Freedom" (August 1941); "You Can’t Do Business With Hitler --A Review" (November 1941) "A Review of National Socialism" (December 1941)
  • Sen. Gerald P. Nye

O

P

R

S

T

W

Y

Sources

  • The Conservative Press in Twentieth-Century America, by Ronald Lora, William Henry Longton, pages 279-281
  • Roosevelt, Churchill, and the World War II Opposition, by George T. Eggleston, page 235

Notes

  1. The Conservative Press in Twentieth-Century America, by Ronald Lora, William Henry Longton, page 273
  2. The American Axis, by Max Wallace, page 255
  3. The Conservative Press in Twentieth-century America edited by Ronald Lora, William Henry Longton, page 274
  4. Roosevelt, Churchill, and the World War II Opposition, by George T. Eggleston, page 101
  5. [1] Notes of a Magaziner X by Paul W. Healy
  6. Roosevelt, Churchill, and the World War II Opposition, by George T. Eggleston, page 156
  7. The Conservative Press in Twentieth-Century America, by Ronald Lora, William Henry Longton, page 398

See also

External links

Personal tools