Government in exile

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A government in exile is a political group which claims to be a country's legitimate government, but is unable to exercise legal power and instead resides in a foreign country.[1] Governments in exile usually plan to one day return to their native country and regain formal power. A government in exile differs from a rump state in the sense that a rump state controls at least part of its former territory.[2] For example, during World War I, nearly all of Belgium was occupied by Germany, but Belgium and its allies held on to a small slice in the country's west. A government in exile, conversely, has lost all its territory.

Governments in exile frequently occur during wartime occupation, or in the aftermath of a civil war, revolution, or military coup. For example, during World War II some European governments sought refuge in the United Kingdom.[3][4] A government in exile may also form from widespread belief in the illegitimacy of a ruling government. For instance, the National Coalition for Syrian Revolutionary and Opposition Forces was formed as a result of the Syrian civil war, which sought to end the rule of the ruling Ba'ath Party.

The effectiveness of a government in exile depends primarily on the amount of support it can receive, either from foreign governments or from the population of its own country. Some governments in exile develop into a formidable force, posing a serious challenge to the incumbent regime of the country, while others are maintained chiefly as a symbolic gesture.[5][6]

See also

Notes

  1. Princeton University WordNet. Wordnetweb.princeton.edu. Retrieved on 2012-09-20.
  2. Tir, J. , 2005-02-22 "Keeping the Peace After Secessions: Territorial Conflicts Between Rump and Secessionist States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-25 from allacademic.com[dead link]
  3. ROC Government in Exile Is Illogical (English transl.). (original source: "「流亡政府」邏輯不通" by NOWnews Network) (June 1, 2010). Retrieved on 7 October 2010.
  4. TIME magazine, Far Eastern Economic Review, Stanford University, US State Dept., Public Broadcasting Service, BBC, US Congressional Research Service, UK Parliament, UK Foreign Office, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, and numerous law journals have all referred to the Republic of China on Taiwan as a government in exile. However, the ROC is recognised as the legitimate government of China by 21 UN member states and the Holy See. The PRC claims that the ROC government no longer exists. Republic of China government in exile, http://www.taiwanbasic.com/taiwanus/rocinexile.htm, retrieved 2010-02-27 
  5. "Treaty confirmed sovereignty: Ma". Taipei Times. 29 April 2009. http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2009/04/29/2003442293. Retrieved 14 June 2010. 
  6. Kerry Dumbaugh (Specialist in Asian Affairs Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division) (23 February 2006). Taiwan’s Political Status: Historical Background and Ongoing Implications. Congressional Research Service. Retrieved on 20 December 2009. “While on October 1, 1949, in Beijing a victorious Mao proclaimed the creation of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Chiang Kai-shek re-established a temporary capital for his government in Taipei, Taiwan, declaring the ROC still to be the legitimate Chinese government-in-exile and vowing that he would “retake the mainland” and drive out communist forces.”
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