Frankfurt am Main

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Frankfurt am Main
Skyline of Frankfurt am Main
Skyline of Frankfurt am Main
Flag of Frankfurt am Main
Coat of arms of Frankfurt am Main
Frankfurt am Main is located in Germany
Frankfurt am Main
Coordinates 50°6′37″N 8°40′56″E / 50.11028°N 8.68222°E / 50.11028; 8.68222
Administration
Country Germany
State Hesse
Admin. region Darmstadt
District Urban district
City subdivisions 16 districts (Ortsbezirke)
46 boroughs (Stadtteile)
Lord Mayor Petra Roth (CDU)
Governing parties CDUGreens
Basic statistics
Area 248.31 km2
Elevation 112 m  (367 ft)
Population 671,927 (31 December 2009)[1]
 - Density 2,706 /km2 (7,009 /sq mi)
 - Urban 2,295,000
 - Metro 5,600,000 (07/2017)
Founded 1st century
Other information
Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Licence plate F
Postal codes 60001-60599, 65901-65936
Area codes 069, 06109, 06101
Website www.frankfurt.de

Frankfurt am Main, commonly known simply as Frankfurt, is the largest city in the German state of Hessen and the fifth-largest city in Germany, with a 2008 population of 670,000. The urban area had an estimated population of 2.26 million in 2001.[2] The city is at the centre of the larger Frankfurt/Rhine-Main Metropolitan Region which has a population of 5.3 million and is Germany's second largest metropolitan area.

In English, this city's name translates to "Frankfurt on the Main" (pronounced like English mine or German mein). The city is located on an ancient ford on the river Main, the German word for which is "Furt". A part of early Franconia, the inhabitants were the early Franks. Thus the city's name receives its legacy as being the "ford of the Franks".[3]

Situated on the Main River, Frankfurt is the financial and transportation centre of Germany and the largest financial centre in continental Europe. It is seat of the European Central Bank, the German Federal Bank, the Frankfurt Stock Exchange and the Frankfurt Trade Fair, as well as several large commercial banks. Frankfurt Airport is one of the world's busiest international airports, Frankfurt Central Station is one of the largest terminal stations in Europe, and the Frankfurter Kreuz (Autobahn interchange) is the most heavily used interchange in continental Europe. Frankfurt is the only German city listed as one of ten Alpha world cities.[4] Frankfurt lies in the former American Occupation Zone of Germany, and it was formerly the headquarters city of the U.S. Army in Germany.

Frankfurt is considered an alpha world city,[5] as listed by the Loughborough University group's 2008 inventory[6], is ranked 21st among global cities by Foreign Policy's 2008 Global Cities Index[7] and is an international centre for commerce, finance, culture, entertainment, education and tourism. According to the Mercer cost of living survey, Frankfurt is Germany’s second most expensive city, and the 48th most expensive in the world.[8] Frankfurt also ranks among the top 10 most livable cities in the world according to Mercer Human Resource Consulting.[9].

Among English speakers the city is commonly known simply as "Frankfurt", though Germans occasionally call it by its full name when it is necessary to distinguish it from the other (significantly smaller) "Frankfurt" in the state of Brandenburg, Frankfurt (Oder).

References

  1. Die Bevölkerung der hessischen Gemeinden (German). Hessisches Statistisches Landesamt (31 December 2009).
  2. (English) World Urban Areas (PDF). Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  3. Room, Adrian (2006). Placenames of the world. McFarland, 135. Retrieved on 2009-07-23. 
  4. World Cities. Retrieved on 2007-01-23.
  5. http://www.lboro.ac.uk/gawc/world2008t.html
  6. Beaverstock, J.V.; Smith, R.G.; Taylor, P.J.. The World According to GaWC 2008. Globalization and World Cities.
  7. Kearney, Inc., A.T.. The 2008 Global Cities Index. Foreign Policy.
  8. Cost of living – The world's most expensive cities. City Mayors.
  9. Mercer's Quality of Living Survey 2009, www.mercer.com. Retrieved on 2 March 2009
Part of this article consists of modified text from Wikipedia, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.
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