Edith Starr Miller

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Lady Queenborough.

Edith Starr Miller title Lady Queenborough (July 16, 1887 - January 16, 1933, Paris) was the author of the work Occult Theocracy. The book was published in 1933 shortly after her death. In her work Miller saw Freemasonry to be Luciferian.

Edith was born in Newport, Rhode Island, the daughter of William Starr Miller [1] and Edith Caroline Warren [2]. Her father was a New York industrialist and real estate operator.

On July 19, 1921, she married Lord Queenborough (Almeric Hugh Paget) at the town house of Edith's parents, which was located at 1048 Fifth Avenue on the corner of 86th Street in Manhattan, New York.[3] After their marriage the Pagets lived at Camfield Place, near Hatfield, Hertfordshire. The interiors of the house were designed by Edith herself.[4] They had three daughters:

The Pagets were pro-Fascist,[5][6][7][8] and Edith in particular was friendly with Brigadier General Robert Byron Drury Blakeney (1872-1952), second president of the British Fascisti from 1924-1926, and later active in the Imperial Fascist League, the Britons, the British Union of Fascists, and the Nordic League.

References

  1. (Oct. 26, 1856 - Sept. 14, 1935)
  2. (April 15, 1866 - May 17, 1944)
  3. "Lord Queenborough Weds Miss Miller. British Peer Quietly Marries Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Starr Miller", The New York Times, July 20, 1921.
  4. Robert Sencourt, Heirs of Tradition. Tributes of a New Zealander, pp. 105-106n. London: Carroll & Nicholson, 1949.
  5. Lord Queenborough, "World Plan in Action", English Review, August 1935.
  6. Lord Queenborough, "All that we hold most dear", Saturday Review, September 19, 1936.
  7. Simon Haxey, England's Money Lords. Tory M.P., p. 131. New York: Harrison-Hilton Books, 1939.
  8. Charles Domville-Fyfe, This is Germany, Foreword by Lord Queenborough. London: Seely Service & Co., Ltd., 1939.

See also

External link

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